Is it possible to be too hot?

The answer is a big yes.  I found this out recently while working from Merida, Mexico.

What the heck am I doing in Merida, Mexico?  Good question, with a simple answer. While it’s possible to be too hot, it’s also possible to be too cold. How can you tell when it’s too cold? When snow is falling in Atlanta.

As soon as the flakes started falling a few weeks ago I took my cue from Mother Nature and headed further south. So here I am in Mexico.
My partner and I were hungry and decided to take the concierge’s recommendation and headed down to a local Yucatan restaurant.  When we arrived we found little ladies making tortillas. From the perspective of this gringo it was an authentic experience.

After repeating my name to the hostess countless times she finally managed to say, “I remember you” in broken English. We waited to be seated and shortly thereafter I began to really know the meaning of too hot, or demasiado caliente.

Much like Mexican restaurants in the U.S., shortly after we were seated the waiter brought us complimentary chips and salsa. The waiter explained what both of the salsa types he brought us were, but in Spanish. In other words, we were clueless.

So, being adventurous, I tried both. The medium salsa – and are you kidding me with this? – I must admit, became addicting. In fact, everything was good. With the salsa it became a matter of how much you could handle. Later that night, or more correctly put, early the next morning, I began to regret my involvement in this game. I won’t go into too much detail, but let’s just say I experienced sensations I’ve never felt before, nor do I care to experience again.
It was sometime around daybreak when I realized, yes Virginia; it is possible for something to be too hot.

Lesson to be learned:
Just like with salsa – when you’re selling yourself to the media, remember there is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

By | 2016-10-13T16:38:15+00:00 January 13th, 2011|

About the Author:

For 30 years, Drew Gerber has been inspiring those who want to change the world. As the CEO of Wasabi Publicity, Inc., lauded by the likes of PR Week and Good Morning America, he sparks "aha" conversations that lead to personal and business success. His PR firm is known for landing clients on Dr. Phil, Oprah, Anderson Cooper, The Wall Street Journal, Inc., Entrepreneur, and other top media outlets. Wasabi Publicity lives to launch conversations that make a difference and change the world.

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